Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, and for good reason. Without it, how do you barrel through a day’s worth of activities without any fuel to keep you energized? Each country has its own way of preparing and eating their breakfast, here are some of them.

Illustrations by: Czari Dy

Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, and for good reason. Without it, how do you barrel through a day’s worth of activities without any fuel to keep you energized? Each country has its own way of preparing and eating their breakfast, here are some of them:

Philippines

In the Philippines, rice is a staple and all the more so in the morning–the favorite and usually biggest meal of the day. A Filipino breakfast meal would not be complete without the following: garlic rice (sinangag), egg (prepared in variations, scrambled and sunny-side-up being the more popular ones), meat/fish, and fruits. This combination is usually called the –silog; the word a portmanteau of whatever meat they want to combine with the rice and egg; and the rice and egg combination (sinangag + itlog = silog). Some of the famous combinations are: tapsilog, spamsilog, and tocilog.

Iran

Because Persians used to travel all the time, their breakfast is light and easy to prepare. The traditional meal is compromised of bread with butter, jam and a cup of Persian tea. Since then, different variations of this meal have been made, especially because a light breakfast might not always hit the spot. Some of these versions are made up of Lavash bread, feta cheese (and tea), or Halim, which is a mixture of wheat, cinnamon, butter, and caramelized meat. On an extra hungry day, the Iranian omelette is thrown in.

England

 

 Baked beans, sausages, hash browns, toast, bacon, grilled tomatoes, eggs, mushrooms–all fried because why not–the optional black pudding, a glass of orange juice and a cup of tea. Pretty much everything you need for a full english breakfast. Top that off with your best impression of an English accent, and you’re pretty much good to go. For added flair (and a couple of laughs): ask the cafe or pub for a ‘Full Monty’.

American

Two words: Bacon. Pancakes. This deadly combination, topped off with maple syrup (yes, for both), eggs, hash browns, possibly some butter, jam and toast, and orange juice is the American version of a heavy breakfast. High-calorie meal, enough to last the entire day? Yes, please.

Japan

Even for breakfast, the Japanese are perfectionists, taking into account a complete, well-balanced and holistic meal. Made up of steamed rice, miso soup, boiled or grilled fish, tamogoyaki (rolled omelet), tsukemono (pickles), nori (dried seaweed) and natto (fermented soy beans) and hot tea. This meal is designed to be both healthy, nourishing and light.

Denmark

For a fancy looking breakfast, try Denmark’s traditional meal. What looks like it came straight out of the hors d’oeuvres section in the buffet table, or the wine and cheese selection is actually the staple on a Danish breakfast plate. From rye bread, to salami, slices of cheese, to ham, pate, honey and jam, and occasionally: plates of chocolate, and a bowl of mixed fruit and nut, the Danish dine in style.

Greece

No, it isn’t (completely) true that Greeks have next to nothing (or cigarettes and coffee) for breakfast. In fact, they have quite the selection. From galatopita (milk pies) to tigantes (Greek pancakes), trahana (pasta with milk), siglino (pork from Mani), their meals are rich in starch and protein; hearty meals for a day of hard work. Not all restaurants offer this combination, so be sure to ask the locals or drop by the restaurant at the Acropolis Museum for some authentic Greek breakfast.

Thailand

Last but not the least, here’s the traditional Thai way of having breakfast. Made up of jauk, which is the the Thai Rice Porridge made up of broken rice, minced pork or chicken meat mixed in a bowl; pa-tong-goh (deep fried donuts) that you can watch the vendors prepare on the spot; nam tau-hu, hot tea made from soy beans (perfect with the donuts); and lastly: khanom khrauk (the Thai mini panckaes) that are made up two parts: the top composed of coconut milk, sugar, and the bottom, composed of ground fresh cooked rice and coconut milk. To add to the taste, try dipping the pancakes in sugar. Here’s a tip: you won’t find this meal at hotels or fancy restaurants, go to the local street vendor from 5:30-7:30in the morning where it’s fresh.

What do you like having for breakfast? Let us know!

Sources:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/elena-paravantes/traditional-greek-breakfast_b_2630496.html

50 of the World’s Best Breakfasts


http://www.thailandbreeze.com/traditional-thai-breakfast.html
http://japanesefood.about.com/cs/styles/a/breakfast.htm
http://www.mypersiankitchen.com/traditional-persian-breakfast/

More for you

Tell me what you think