“Do you like… cheese?” “Why yes, my favorite’s Gouda!” If you’re not familiar with this (almost) iconic movie line, shame on you. Kidding aside, to answer that question—who doesn’t like cheese? Here’s a rundown of our favorites: 

“Do you like… cheese?” “Why yes, my favorite’s Gouda!” If you’re not familiar with this (almost) iconic movie line, shame on you. Kidding aside, to answer that question—who doesn’t like cheese? Here’s a rundown of our favorites: 

Kesong Puti – Philippines

One of the Filipino favorites that is now a classic in most Filipino restaurants is Laguna’sKesong Puti (white cheese). Made from unskimmed carabao milk (yes carabao, not cow), Kesong Puti, made distinct by its slightly pungent smell, is normally wrapped in banana leaves. The texture is soft, almost as if the cheese will melt in your mouth. Best eaten at breakfast with pandesal (bread) and coffee. 

Roquefort – France 

Roquefort, a kind of blue cheese that comes all the way from France is a product of sheep’s milk. Here’s a little piece of trivia about the infamous blue cheese: those blue pockets of moldyou can see on the cheese are actually found in the caves of Roquefort, France—thus, its name. Eaten best with nuts and honey, the blue cheese is left to age for five months and is now considered a staple in wine and cheese plates. 

Cotija – Mexico

 

Named after a city in Mexico, the Mexican Cotija is very similar to the Greek Feta especially when young as it is somewhat salty and moist. The hardcow milk does not retain its feta-like texture though, as the cheese becomes nuttier the older it gets; but that’s not the only thing the Cojita is famous for. It’s also the cheese that you taste in your tacos, Mexican soup, Mexican salad and guacamole.

Feta – Greece

Did you know the Feta can only bear its name if the product came from either mainland Greece or Lesbos and is made with at least 70% sheep’s milk and 30% goat’s milk? I don’t know about you, but if that’s not enough to give testament to how seriously the Greek take their cheese, then I don’t know what will. The feta, tangy and salty (almost as if it was dipped in salt water), is usually placed in olive oil, to be used in salads, sandwiches and in place of the Cojita for some Mexican dishes.

Mozzarella – Italy 

From Italy hails one of the world’s cheesy favorites and that is, you guessed it, Mozzarella. Made from the milk of the water buffalo (let’s call it the mozzarella di bufala for added flair) or cow milk (mozzarella fior di latte), it is usually heated in warm water and stretched by hand. From there, Mozzarella is then rolled into moist cheese balls (literally); and can either be sold fresh or mixed with brine for flavor. Try it with tomatoes and basil and there you have some Margherita realness. (As for the real recipe, don’t ask me!) 

Emmental – Switzerland (Swiss Cheese, basically) 

Swiss Cheese, if you please! Yes, that’s exactly what Emmental cheese is. One of the (many) cheeses of Switzerland, it has a very distinct taste (and not to mention, look), produced by the bacteria used in the latter stages of the cheese production. Now, where did the Swiss Cheese get its holes? We might just have a theory for that: the bacteria used in creating the cheese releases carbon dioxide gas. Because of this, carbon dioxide bubbles are created, eventually creating large holes, now one of the iconic characteristics of Swiss cheese. 

Gouda – Holland 

Last but definitely not the least, the star of Amanda Bynes’ almost-iconic line from She’s the Man: Gouda. While it is named after the Dutch city, Gouda, the cheese is no longer exclusively produced in Holland. Since its creation, it has been made available all over Europe, Israel and even New Zealand and Australia. From the mild and creamy flavor (this is especially true the younger the cheese is) to crunchier texture (for when it’s older), Gouda can come in lots of flavors and variations depending on how it was made, and how old it is. 

Love cheese us much as we do? Let us know your favorite by leaving a comment below 🙂 

Sources: 

http://www.seriouseats.com/2011/10/13-cheeses-everyone-should-know-slideshow.html#show-179939/

http://doonposaamin.ph/articles/food-to-eat/6-cheesy-facts-about-kesong-puti-of-laguna/ 

 

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