Tea has been and still is a favorite all over the world. Second to water, it is the most widely consumed beverage. And why shouldn’t it be? It’s easy to brew, tastes great, can be consumed in several ways, and provides many health benefits.

Here are seven different ways people from all over the world prepare their tea:

Philippines: Salabat (Ginger) Tea

Tea was popularized in the Philippines by the Chinese who moved to the Philippines before the country’s Spanish colonization. Now, tea is consumed in the Philippines in many ways but the most “Filipino” way of drinking tea is by preparing Salabat.

Tea was popularized in the Philippines by the Chinese who moved to the Philippines before the country’s Spanish colonization. Now, tea is consumed in the Philippines in many ways but the most “Filipino” way of drinking tea is by preparing Salabat.

Japan: Matcha

In Japan, drinking tea is not just about drinking tea. For them, it is a spiritual experience that symbolizes “harmony, respect, purity and tranquillity.” Because of this, before they drink tea, they perform traditional tea ceremonies that are considered an art that one has to perfect with years of practice. During these tea ceremonies, they serve the famous matcha, which is made up of finely ground Japanese tea leaves.

Africa: Touareg Tea (Moroccan Mint Tea)

The famous Moroccan Mint tea, locally known as the Touareg Tea, has a colorful history. In Africa, the Touareg tea is a symbolism of hospitality and is considered the heart of the African culture. Africans serve mint tea—spearmint dipped in green tea—to guests three times. Each cup of tea symbolizes a whole new meaning: life, love, and death. Refusing to accept tea from the host is considered extremely rude and highly discouraged. On the same note, all three glasses of tea must be consumed.

Tibet: Tibetan po Cha

Up in the Himalayas, the Tibetans drink tea for a different reason: to keep themselves warm. Their tea, called the Tibetan po Cha, is also known as butter tea. Made up of tea brewed for half a day to get a bitter taste and churned with yak butter and salt, the tea is more salty than it is sweet, but this is exactly how the nomads like it. It is said that they can consume almost 40 cups a day, giving them the energy they need for their particularly high altitude.

Hong Kong: Milk Tea (the original)

If you’ve ever wondered where milk tea came from, look no further. The widely consumed milk tea originated in Hong Kong, and is actually known there as “pantyhose tea.” Now before you get any weird theories as to why that is, the locals actually named Milk Tea like so because the color is similar to nude stockings (no kidding). Hong Kong’s milk tea is made up of chilled black tea and is mixed with evaporated or condensed milk to get the sweetened flavor and can be served hot or cold. In Hong Kong though, the milk tea is usually served iced.

United Kingdom: Tea and Biscuits

Long ago, tea-drinking in the United Kingdom was associated to the wealthy and the country’s royalty. The afternoon tea, known then as “high tea” was taken from 4-6 pm, and is actually a name for their meal (and not just the beverage that comes with it). Now, the United Kingdom is one of the biggest consumers of tea. Often accompanied with a light snack, their tea is usually taken with milk, but it is not uncommon to have it black or with lemon.

China: The Origin of Tea

Last but definitely not the least: the origin of tea. The Chinese, who were first to discover tea (and have been drinking it ever since), regard it as a synonym of life. Today, tea is even considered one of the Chinese’s seven necessities. If that’s not enough to get you to believe how important tea is to their culture, their only national museum in Hangzhou has a detailed description of the development of tea culture in their country. The Chinese prepare tea in different ways, but it is always accompanied by a tea ceremony (that the Japanese learned from them) called the “cha dao”. They use different tea leaves and flavors, but their most popular variety is the green tea.

Sources:

http://www.buzzfeed.com/chelseypippin/22-cups-of-tea-from-around-the-world#.wtR0zERLl

http://www.teavana.com/tea-info/japanese-tea-ceremony

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/foodanddrinkpicturegalleries/10125172/Tea-traditions-around-the-world-in-pics.html

http://www.worldteanews.com/news/10-tea-traditions-around-world#sthash.RTH1haNn.dpuf –

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