Do you ever feel good about yourself after working out? Do you get motivated to strive even more to achieve your fitness goals? If your answer is yes, you landed on the right page. If you’re wondering why after pushing yourself hard in the gym makes you mostly happier than tired, that is because your physical health is intrinsically linked to your mental health. The two have a fundamental connection that affects your life, especially when doing activities such as exercise.

Many people are fond of working out because it helps them achieve the body that they want. But for some, they can’t just seem to start because of lack of motivation and inspiration. Also, some exercises can be too daunting to start– that is why some just choose to live a sedentary lifestyle. We all know that exercise has a lot of benefits for the body and your physical appearance, but not a lot of people know that even our mental health is improving when we are working out. It is important and necessary to know the relevance of exercise to your physical and mental health. To know more about it, read on:

 

The Chemicals In Our Brain

When we exercise, our body sends signals to the brain that would initiate the release of chemicals such as the brain-derived neurotrophic factor and endorphins. These said chemicals help us become more motivated to work harder.  BDNF or the brain-derived neurotrophic factor helps us clear our mind and have a positive outlook in life while endorphins, on the other hand, act as a tool that makes us feel more lively and optimistic. That is why despite the pain that we are feeling while exercising, we still get more determined to push through. These chemicals are very important as they play a big role in our lives, even outside exercise.

 

Prevention of Illnesses

Physical health and mental health are connected to each other, which is why if you are not mentally strong, it would be hard for you to begin working out. The same goes vice versa. According to Canadian Mental Health Association, poor mental health is a risk factor for chronic physical conditions and people with chronic physical conditions are at risk of developing poor mental health. The two are highly associated with each other. Thus, in order to save one, you have to start improving the other. With that, you are allowing yourself to be better and you will be able to prevent illnesses (both the physical and mental) as well.

 

Improving Your Diet

It is important to acknowledge the fact that your diet plays a big part in reaching your fitness goal and it will be hard for someone who is not both physically and mentally strong to succeed. If you are not eating right, you may feel more tired and sluggish. Exercise isn’t the only thing that can improve our mental health, a balanced diet is also necessary to focus on in order to have a healthy lifestyle. Starting your day with a simple workout may lead to an enthusiastic outlook and better diet choices.

 

The Bottomline

Always prioritize exercise as it is not just a way to enhance your physical state but it can also better your mental state. According to studies, people who exercise more often are less likely to develop depression compared to those who don’t. It is highly suggested that people start working out as soon as possible. Begin your day with exercise or any type of activity that will loosen up your body so that you will feel more lively and relaxed throughout the day. It is important to get your heart pumping and it is suggested to have at least 30 minutes of exercise per day. Your physical and mental health coexist and both can be improved through your own initiative.

 

Exercise is really something that you should not take for granted. Start now for you to be able to achieve two strokes of luck instead of a double-whammy. You may struggle in the beginning but everything will surely be worth it!

 

Sources:

https://ontario.cmha.ca/documents/connection-between-mental-and-physical-health/

https://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/a-to-z/p/physical-health-and-mental-health

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endorphins

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brain-derived_neurotrophic_factor

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